Always Something to Learn (HDR).

There’s one thing about photography, and that is there’s always something to learn.  If you think you know it all, you’re just not trying anything new or different, or you’re in a rut.  I’ve been interested in photography for a long time, and it seems like there’s always something new.  Whether it’s a new piece of equipment, some new software, or a new post processing technique, there’s always something to learn and keep it interesting.

Now I’ve mentioned in previous posts the technique called HDR (High Dynamic Range).  The process involves the blending of 3 images of varying exposure and ending up with 1 image that not only has detail in the highlights, but in the shadows as well.  It allows the image to be much more real in terms of what the person experienced when they made it.  Your eyes (and brain) can process much more range of light and dark in a scene than your camera can.  That’s why when you look at a scene of a beautiful cloudy sky, trees, and a lake, you can see all of it.  Then you take a picture and are disappointed when the sky is blown out an you can’t see any of the clouds, and the trees near the lake are so dark there isn’t much detail.  This is the perfect time to try HDR.

You can find a lot of information on HDR.  One of the best places to start is Trey Ratcliff’s website:
Stuck in Customs

After dabbling in HDR for a little while now, I’ve been wanting to refine my technique.  But it seemed like I was always ending up with the same type of image, kind of edgy, maybe a little over done, and everyone once in a while I’d really nail one.  In my quest for more information, I found a great resource in an ebook.  I have a Nook Tablet and love to use it for reading so I started to search for photography books in general, and found “Improve Your HDR Photography” by Jim Harmer.  This book is only 138 pages, but gets right to it.  I found some very useful, very specific information on improving my HDR photography, just like the title says.  For less than 10 dollars this little ebook is a real winner.  You can see some of Jim’s work here:  Jim Harmer Photography

So, here’s what I have after reading the book.  This is a re-do of an image that I wasn’t really happy with from the 1st go round with HDR.  Here’s the before:

It’s ok, but I thought it could be better.  For my re-do I merged these 3 shots with Photomatix:
 Normal exposure.
Underexposed by 1 stop.
Overexposed by 1 stop.
All 3 were opened in Photomatix, blended, and tone-mapped.  After that, it was into Photoshop  for some final adjustments.  
The final product has more realistic colors and tones.  Compared to my 1st attempt, I think this version is more dramatic and true to what I actually experienced that wonderful evening.
That’s it, hope you liked this post!  See you next time!