P-38J, 23 Skidoo, Planes of Fame Air Museum

Planes of Fame Living History Events

It was my pleasure to attend one of the Planes of Fame Air Museum’s (in Chino, California) Living History Events.  They have one of these wonderful events every month.  The topic of this month’s event was the Lockheed Skunk Works.  Along with guest speaker presentations, there are usually static displays of relevant aircraft and a flight demonstration.

I think one of the things that attracts me to an event like this is to hear, first hand from Veterans, what it was like to be involved in a particular aspect of one of the wars, flying the aircraft, or in some cases designing and building aircraft.  There’s so much information that is shared and it’s great that you can hear it straight from the guys who were there, and actually did the things you might have heard or read about.  Although the seats aren’t that comfortable (I can’t sit in one place too long anymore), I started to pay less attention to my ass falling asleep and more to the presentation.

One of the other things I noticed was that this event drew a lot of people – the place was packed!  And there was nothing but respect shown for the Veterans and other guest speakers.  Let’s face it, speaking in front of a crowd can be intimidating, and not everyone can just start talking and not get a little nervous.  That didn’t seem to matter, the audience was quiet, patient, and showed respect, and the event continued on.

In addition to the guest speakers, there’s usually a warbird or two on display outside of the hangars.  And if everything goes well, there’s also a flight demonstration.  As usual, I have a camera or two with me, and for this event I brought my Olympus E-M5 and assorted lenses, and my Sony RX100.  Both cameras worked perfectly for shots in and around the static displays.  I kept my 45-200mm Panasonic lens on the E-M5 and used the RX100 for anything close up.  The only trouble I had was when the P-38J went up for the flight demonstration.  While I was able to grab a few shots of the P-38 in the air, they weren’t that good and I’m not going to post any.  The E-M5 isn’t the best option for fast moving aircraft (no phase-detection-autofocus, tracking focus mode is poor).  Was I disappointed?  No, not really.  I knew there was a compromise to be made by bringing the E-M5 and leaving my Canon at home.  The Canon 60D has no problem with fast moving objects, but with the Tamron 200-500mm lens, it’s big and heavy.  Seems like it gets heavier with every year I get older.  But the up side is portability!  I was able to fit all of my gear (2 cameras, 4 lenses) in a single bag.  Besides, there’ll be plenty of opportunities for photos of planes in the air when I start going to the air shows!

If you are interested in vintage aircraft or warbirds, then consider visiting the Planes of Fame Air Museum.  Better yet, try to make it out to one of their monthly events.  I’ve met some very friendly folks, some just interested in the warbirds, and others that are interested in both – the warbirds and photography!  If you really like this type of thing, think about becoming a member!  I finally did it during the event, and looking back should have done it a long time ago!

Here are some photos from the event:








That’s it for this post. Don’t forget to click on the links to the Planes of Fame Air Museum and check it out! Thanks for looking and Happy Shooting!