All posts by kf6ybl

Air Show Photos – 60D

My last post was about using my new Panasonic FZ1000 at the Planes of Fame Air Show.  I was able to attend all 3 days of the show, and brought 3 cameras with me including the FZ1000, the Olympus E-M5, and my Canon 60D.  This post is about the time I spent with my 60D.

Although I did bring the 60D to the 1st day of the air show, I didn’t use it after that.  Why?  Because I was so impressed with the capabilities and performance of the FZ1000.  It’s not physically smaller than the 60D, at least not the body, but when the 60D is connected to my Tamron 200-500mm lens it’s much smaller and lighter.  It also seems to focus faster, and can shoot at 12 fps which is more than twice as fast as the 60D’s 5.5 fps.  Is there a downsize for using the FZ1000 in place of the 60D?  Maybe.  My 60D can accept different lenses – the FZ1000 has a fixed lens.  With the Tamron 200-500mm lens the 60D has more reach.  The 60D has a larger APS-C sensor, the FZ1000 has a smaller 1″ sensor.  There are some people that think this automatically disqualifies the FZ1000 for air show photography.  In fact, I’ve been told that the FZ1000 lacks color depth, saturation, and other subjective things.  I respectfully disagree, and am not going to get caught up in an endless debate about technical details and pixel peeping.  There are plenty of examples out there that disprove this notion.  And besides, I judge a photo by how well it’s composed, how the light is used, does it tell a story, etc…  Not very scientific, but that’s just the way I roll!

So, what does this mean for my 60D?  Unfortunately it means I will be using it even less than I do now.  I’ve been on a quest to get my gear smaller while retaining image quality.  My FZ1000 could probably fill all of the roles I ask of my cameras including air shows, landscapes, and family photos.  For now I think I’ll keep the FZ1000 as my multi-role camera, my E-M5 as my low light landscape camera, and my RX100 as my fast and discrete pocketable camera.  That doesn’t leave any room for my extra equipment, like the 60D and Panasonic GX-1, and I may be selling them sometime soon.

I don’t have a lot of 60D photos from the air show, but wanted to share some of them.





That’s it for this post, until next time – Happy Shooting!

My FZ1000 at an Air Show.

Wow, I can’t believe how fast time flies!  The 2015 Planes of Fame Air Show has already come and gone.  It’s one of my favorite photo events of the year.  Well, there was one thing new about it, they had an afterburner after dark feature.  This part of the show is exactly what it sounds like, and the F-18 and F-22 really delivered!  It was a lot of fun and made the usual Friday routine much better!  Oh, there was one more thing, I used my new camera, the Panasonic FZ1000.

As usual, I’m not here to do an exhaustive scientific review, but rather share my impressions after having used the FZ1000 for 3 days straight and making several thousand photos.  I’m also not doing an in-depth air show review, sorry.  Let’s just say that if you are in the Southern California area in May and you love vintage aircraft, including WWII Warbirds, late model Korean/Vietnam War era planes, and even some modern high tech jets, than you owe it to yourself to check out the Planes of Fame Air Show and Museum!  If you do go, bring your camera, plenty of memory cards and batteries, a wide brimmed hat, chair, and sun screen.

I actually had 3 cameras set up for the air show this year.  My trusty Canon 60D with Tamron 200-500mm lens, and the Olympus E-M5 with 7.5mm Rokinon Fisheye, Olympus 17mm f/1.8, and Panasonic 45-200mm.  I also brought along my Red Dot Sight (RDS) for my E-M5.  The idea was to use it instead of the electronic viewfinder (EVF).  I could keep both eyes open, put the red dot on my target, follow it in the sky and snap away.  It didn’t quite work out for me, more than likely because I need more practice.  So the RDS went back in the bag and while I did use the E-M5 from time to time, it mostly stayed in the bag.

My 60D and big Tamron always work.  And I did start out using them.  That is until I got the FZ1000 out of the bag.  It felt perfect in my hands.  Larger in size than my E-M5, and maybe even a bit bigger than my 60D’s body, but much lighter.  It has a much better viewfinder than my E-M5 (in my opinion), and shoots faster than the 60D or E-M5 (12 fps vs 5.5 fps and 9 fps).  And the best thing is that it does very well with fast moving objects, especially in good light, which was very plentiful.  Although I’ve read many, many reviews and personal accounts on the FZ1000’s performance, I was still impressed when I experienced it in person.  Once I got the feel of the FZ1000 on the first day of the show, the 60D went back in the bag and stayed there.  I never used it again for the next 2 days of the air show.

The FZ1000 looked a little out of place compared to my photography friends Canon 1DX and other photographers equally large Canons and Nikons.  But I wasn’t there to impress anyone with my gear.  I was there to enjoy the show, and that meant not lugging around a heavy bag of stuff.  Yes, my 60D and Tamron 200-500mm offer a lot of reach but the FZ1000 can get out there too at 400mm.  And did I mention that it’s fast?  Wow (again), is it fast?!  As soon as I brought it up to my eye and half pressed the shutter, it would almost immediately lock on and I could fire off a burst at 12 fps.  There were plenty of misses, but also a lot more keepers.  In fact my keeper rate was so good that I came home with upwards of 4,000 frames to sift through.  I’ve been steadily reviewing my photos since the event last week and have deleted hundreds.  Having so many is allowing me to get very picky, which is a good thing.  There’s really no reason to have 4 or 5 near duplicates of virtually the same image.  Having such a fast burst rate can really fill up a memory card too.  Not complaining, just sharing.  One more thing to share is memory card write speed.  My Transcend 32 GB SD cards are not quite fast enough to keep up.  Looks like I’m going to need to upgrade them.  Good thing they don’t cost too much.

Getting back to the reach, the 60D and 200-500mm Tamron have an advantage over the FZ1000’s 400mm.  But as the show went on and I got more used to the FZ1000, I found 400mm to be quite enough.  The trick is to wait for the planes to come closer.  I noticed that everyone around me would start shooting when the planes were much too far away.  All you are going to get when you do that is a little dot on the screen with a bunch of sky.  All of the planes made plenty of passes and would usually come around for what’s known as a photo pass.  That means when they flew by they would bank and tilt their wings giving you a much better view.  They were also much closer than when they were grouping up and trying to get into a formation.  I also took advantage of takeoffs, landings, and the planes moving back and forth on the hot ramp.  This was another area that the FZ1000 worked perfectly.  I didn’t need to change lenses when I wanted a wide shot.  I just zoomed out and pressed the button!  If something changed, I could quickly zoom back in and grab a detail shot.

Are there any downsides to the FZ1000?  Sure!  Compared to my 60D the battery life is poor.  But the same can be said for my E-M5.  The remedy is to have extra batteries, no big deal.  For it’s size, the FZ1000 is fairly light weight.  It doesn’t have the build quality that my E-M5 does.  That doesn’t mean it’s a delicate little flower, you just need to be mindful not to get too rough with it.  No different than any other piece of electronic equipment.

And now for the results!













Something to note about the photos above, they’ve all been edited in one way or another. None of this is straight out of the camera. I shoot RAW with the express intention that the images will be post processed.

I have so many photos from this air show that I’m going to create a new gallery for them, so check back from time to time for that. And since I brought them with me, I am going to do a follow up on the air show and my 60D and E-M5.

That’s it for this post, I hope you enjoyed it! Until next time, Happy Shooting!

Using the GX-1 at an Air Museum

I have a Panasonic GX-1. It was purchased on a whim because of a “deal of the day” advertisement that I saw online. The deal was too good to pass up!  The GX-1 showed up in a few days and I immediately started using it.  And then, it stayed unused in a camera bag.

My thought on getting the GX-1 was as a back up camera to my Olympus E-P3.  Both of these cameras are in the same class, Micro Four Thirds (MFT) and are known as mirrorless cameras.  Neither one has an optical or electronic viewfinder and you must rely on the LCD on the back of the camera for picture taking.  While not really pocketable, they are both much smaller than my DSLR (Canon 60D), and produce very nice images.  This type of camera is generally not very good at any type of fast action photography, but do quite well for just about anything else.

I really loved my Olympus E-P3, from the moment I first picked it up.  It felt solid and has a nice retro look.  I’ve taken some very nice photos with it too!  The E-P3 is starting to show its age, especially with its older 12mp sensor.  Low light high ISO capability was not really one of its strengths.  To counter that and work within this limitation, I kept the ISO low and put the E-P3 on a tripod in low light.  The solid build has come into play for me personally.  While out hiking with the E-P3, I slipped and fell – twice!  I came away with some scrapes and bruises, and so did the E-P3.  Nothing too serious but there are a couple of battle scars on it.  Other than the pop-up flash not working very well, the rest of it is just fine.

As for the GX-1, it doesn’t have a very solid feel and is definitely not retro.  The body doesn’t look bad, it just seems like it has more plastic than the E-P3.  Both the GX-1 and E-P3 have plenty of external controls and touch screens.  I’m kind of funny in that I don’t really care for the touch screens and turned them off.  The GX-1 is a very capable camera, and has a newer 16mp sensor and better low light, high ISO performance than the E-P3, and when I used it, found that it too produced some very nice images.  The other plus of having the GX-1 is that being a MFT camera, it could use all of the lenses that I currently had for the E-P3.  I just never really warmed up to it and didn’t use it, especially after getting my Olympus E-M5.

A week or so ago, I was digging around in my camera bags and saw the GX-1.  I decided to get it out, dust it off, and give it another try.  One of the places that I enjoy walking around and using my cameras is the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino California.  It’s fairly close, and always has interesting subjects.  What better place to get re-acquainted with the GX-1!

To my surprise, I enjoyed using the GX-1 more this time than I had when I first got it.  I used my Olympus 17mm f/1.8 and 45mm f1/8 lenses and tried to capture images in a variety of conditions.  Nothing that I want to get too technical about, suffice it to say that there was quite an extreme difference in the indoor lights of the hangars and the harsh mid-day sun.  Not the most ideal shooting conditions, but very realistic.  You can’t always have an epic sunrise or sunset with deliciously warm, golden light.  Sometimes you have to work with what you have!

Here are some of the pictures from that day.  I had the GX-1 in aperture priority mode, and changed the aperture (f/stop) and ISO according to the brightness of the light.  I also set the camera to shoot RAW for the express purpose of post processing.  I know there are some that don’t like post processing, and that’s just fine for them.  Personally, I enjoy working on my photos and finding new methods for creating an image.  Sometimes it’s black and white, sometimes HDR, and other times just a few minor tweaks.  Since I don’t consider myself a journalist or documentarian, I have no problem with post processing.  But to each his own, it’s all good!

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m very pleased with the GX-1, it was fun to use again.  It’s fairly small and easy to carry around.  I got used to changing settings and didn’t have to fumble around too much.  The RAW files provide good quality images with plenty of pixels for me to play with in post.  I think I’m going to keep it out and use it some more!  Unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer, but is still available if you look around.  I found it on Amazon – GX-1.

That’s it for this post, until next time – Happy Shooting!