Tag Archives: air museum

I Switched to FujiFilm!

Seems like I start all of my posts this way –
“It’s been awhile since my last post”.  Sorry about that, I haven’t had much going on in the way of photography lately.

Part of my downtime can be attributed to my switching from M43 (Olympus and Panasonic) to FujiFilm.  I sold off just about all of my M43 gear, except my Olympus E-P3.  Unfortunately, this camera was just too old and not worth much, and I didn’t want to just give it away to the camera store, so I kept it.

What I ended up with is a pair of very nice Fuji’s, the X100T and the XT-1 with 18-135mm lens.  This post will mostly be about the XT-1.

Why did I do this?  First off, there was nothing wrong with my M43 gear.  It all performed quite well.  I was just looking for something, different.  It’s hard to quantify.  The Fuji’s have some advantages over the M43 gear.  One of the main things is the sensor, it’s an
APS-C sensor, making it larger than the M43’s sensor.  The Fuji’s are also much better at low light using high ISO’s.

One of the other reasons was that I needed to trim down the amount of equipment that I had.  There were times when we packed up our motorhome for a trip, and I loaded up 5 camera bags.  If I had it, it went in a bag and cluttered things up.  So, this was a good time to make a move.  I did a lot of research and the Fuji’s seem to rate quite well.  Following will be my impressions of the XT-1.  Please note – these are just my opinions based on my experience and usage.  Nothing scientific here.  I’m sure you can do a Google search and come up with plenty of that!

On Saturday (Feb. 4th), there was a Ham Radio event at the Palm Springs Air Museum.  I have a Ham Radio license, and have recently gotten more active.  The venue for this event happens to be a wonderful air museum.  The Palm Springs Air Museum is right next to the airport and has a beautiful back drop of San Jacinto Peak and the San Jacinto Mountain Range.  The weather was great, mostly clear blue skies and about 70 degrees.  There was some wind, but that’s to be expected with a storm heading into the area over the next couple of days.

I packed my XT-1 with 18-135mm lens in a small messenger bag and headed out.  There are several planes out in front of the museum, so I started off with an F-18.  The XT-1 feels very solid in my hands, like a precision instrument.  It’s just big enough to feel like I can get a good grip on it, but not so big that it’s a pain to carry around.   One of the things that I really liked about the Fuji’s is all of the external  controls.  There are quite a few dials on the body, and it saves you from having to constantly having to dive into the menus to make a change.

After I pulled the XT-1 out of the bag, I grabbed a couple of quick shots of the F-18.  Since I wasn’t used to the camera, I took a look at the results on the screen.  Oops!  I should have paid more attention to all of my settings.  I thought I was in Aperture Priority mode, but was actually in Manual mode.  I made the appropriate adjustments and fired off a couple more frames.  The results this time were better.  I needed to slow down and be much more methodical and deliberate than I was accustomed to when using my M43 gear.  I realized that I was still in the “getting to know you” phase with my new Fuji.  

The 18-135mm Fuji lens seems like a good choice for an all around, general purpose lens.  While it is a little larger than most of the M43 lens (physically, not in focal length), it wasn’t a burden to use in this setting.  One of the nice about this lens is that it’s stabilized.  I like the range of this zoom, it seems to cover most of what I need for most of what I do (landscapes, family gatherings, etc…).  If I need to go longer, I did keep my Panasonic FZ1000!

My time with the XT-1 was somewhat short, just a couple of hours, and some of that time was shared by wandering around the Ham Radio event.  Overall, I am more than pleased with the XT-1.  I’m looking forward to getting out and using it more.  I also have the Fuji X100T that needs some quality time.  I’ll write about that in another post.

Once I got home and downloaded the photos, I was happy with the results.  I found the images clean, with very little noise.  I shoot in both RAW + Jpeg, but have found that both file types require very little in the way of post processing.  I still enjoy giving my photos that personal touch, but they do quite well all by themselves.

Here are some of the photos from the Palm Spring Air Museum.  If you are in the area, check it out!

F-18 Hornet, Palm Springs Air Museum.
F-14 Tomcat, Palm Springs Air Museum
SBD Dauntless, F-8 Bearcat, TBM Avenger on the backside of the Palm Spring Air Museum
Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, Miss Josephine , Palm Springs Air Museum
P-51D, Bunny, Palm Springs Air Museum
F8 Bearcat, Palm Springs Air Museum
AT-6/SJN Texan, Palm Springs Air Musuem
Submarine Spitfire, Palm Springs Air Museum

 

That’s it for this post. Until next time – Happy Shooting!

Aviation Photography for the Average Joe

Wow, it has been quite a while since I last posted anything here.  The holidays have come and gone and it’s a new year! I want to start it off right with a fresh new post, and a freebie!

If you’ve been to this website before, you know how much I enjoy aviation photography, especially air shows and air museums. The other thing you may have gathered from this site is that I don’t have high dollar gear. Most of my equipment is average at best and most of my photography is much slower paced than air shows, so I don’t need a high end sports camera and lens. Over the past ten years of attending air shows, I’ve learned to make what I have work, and that’s what I want to share with you.  If I can do it, so can you!

For the past month, I’ve been working on an e-book called “Aviation Photography for the Average Joe”. The purpose of it is to provide information on aviation photography for all of us average photographers that enjoy things like air shows but have average gear. I’m not trying to pass myself off as a professional or an expert, just another “Average Joe” that has some experience that may be helpful to others.

Here’s the link: Aviation Photography for the Average Joe

When you click on the link you’ll be able to download the pdf file. I hope that this helps and shows you what can be done with modest gear. If you find it useful then please go to my Facebook page and leave a comment, or click the “Like” button. Feel free to share, all I ask is that no changes are made and proper credit given.

Thanks, and until next time – Happy Shooting!