Tag Archives: Olympus

Panasonic GX8 & Air Show, Part 1

It’s been quite a while since I’ve posted anything here.  There are a couple of reasons for that.  One is I’ve been preoccupied with our new motorhome.  I was doing a bit of work on it to get it ready for upcoming adventures.  Since this is the one we are going to live in for awhile I want to know it inside and out.  Second is that I’ve just haven’t done much with photography for the past few months, that is except family events.  So I really haven’t had much to write about.

That’s changed now.  I’ve been to 2 air shows in the last few weeks and have had mixed results.  The first air show was the Airfest at March Field in Riverside California.  I opted to view it from the March Field Air Museum, directly across the runways from the actual show.  It was appealing because of a much smaller crowd (and traffic).  The downside is that the flight patterns kept the planes mostly over on the other side of the runways, and not very close to us.  Every once in awhile one would come over and we could grab a few shots.  The main problem I had was in experimenting with ND filters.  I put one on my FZ1000 and my E-M5 (with Olympus 75-300mm lens).  The ND filters I used were too strong and blocked too much light.  I thought it would be a good idea to use them to allow me to get a better aperture with my selected shutter speed.  My mistake was in not checking the results while I was still at the air show and had the ability to make changes.  Oh well, live and learn!

One thing that became very apparent was how well my FZ1000 performed, and out performed my E-M5.  I’ve had limited success with fast moving objects using my E-M5, but it’s been mostly an exercise in frustration. The last thing I wanted to do was buy another camera, but that’s how it worked out.  I got a great deal on a Panasonic GX8 (body only).  The GX8 is quite an advancement over my E-M5.  The specifications are impressive and you can find plenty of websites with as much information as you can stand.

For me, there are a couple of advantages of the GX8 right out of the box.  The first is that being a Micro Four Thirds (M43) camera all of my current lenses will work with it.  The second is the GX8 and FZ1000 use the same battery.  There is a third advantage, and that is the menu system is very similar to the FZ1000.  Finding my way around took very little time.

The Planes of Fame Air Show is happening now, and I’ve been to the Friday Afterburners After Dark session and will return with my Sunrise Photo Pass for Sunday.  Friday was a lot of fun and I was finally able to really put my new GX8 to good use.  It took a bit of time to get used to the way the GX8 handled, but there were some times when I reached for my FZ1000.  My trusty FZ1000 performed quite well.  I’m still impressed with it.  The GX8 has great potential and I’m looking forward to using on Sunday.  So far it’s been wonderful for quickly locking focus and allowing me to grab a few frames.  It processes them quickly as well and has a big enough buffer so it doesn’t seem to get bogged down.

I ending this post and will do a Part 2 after the air show on Sunday.  By then I’ll have put several thousand frames through the GX8 and can form a better opinion.  Until then here’s what I’ve been able to do:

Until next time, Happy Shooting!

FZ1000, Landscape Camera?

Can a camera like the Panasonic FZ1000 be used as a landscape camera?  I’ve seen questions like this, not only for the FZ1000, but also for other small sensor cameras.  From my experience using several different types of cameras, I’d say – Yes!

Yes, of course you can use the FZ1000 for landscapes, or anything else for that matter.  It all depends on your expectations.  If you want to use the FZ1000 in good light, and put it on a tripod from time to time, I think you’ll find that it works quite well.  The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is big and bright, and the controls are easily accessed to make any changes that you’d like.  Put a 62mm filter on it (like a polarizer or ND) and go for it!

Now, if you want to do some handheld, low light shooting, that’s a different story.  While the FZ1000 does quite well with its built-in image stabilizer and decent high ISO performance, it can’t compete with larger sensor cameras (Canon 6D, 5D, etc….).  If that’s what you want to do, then you need to step up your game, and spend some serious money on the larger sensor camera and even more money on fast lenses.

Getting back to the FZ1000 as a landscape camera, I have to say that overall I’ve been very pleased with its performance.  I was recently able to spend a few weeks in the Eastern Sierra for the annual turning of the leaves.  The Fall Color is always a favorite subject of mine.  I switched back and forth between my M43 Olympus E-M5 and the FZ1000.  Here are a few highlights from using each camera for landscapes:

  • E-M5
    Small, very solid in the hand
    Interchangeable lenses
    Plenty of external controls
    Poor EVF
  • FZ1000
    Not so small, not quite as solid in the hand
    Fixed zoom lens, great range
    Plenty of external controls
    Excellent EVF

My plan of walking/hiking with both cameras was to see how each performed in similar settings.  Nothing scientific about it, just my “seat of the pants” experiences.  To cut to the quick, both cameras worked well.  Trying to keep things simple, I put each camera in its own bag.  Even though the FZ1000 is physically larger than the E-M5, it was lighter in the bag because of its wonderful fixed zoom lens.  The E-M5’s bag was a little heavier because I had to carry a few different lenses to match the range of the FZ1000.  Heavy is a relative term in this situation.  Compared to a larger DSLR and equally large lens, both the FZ1000 and E-M5 are very light and easy to walk/hike with!

Along with the E-M5 and FZ1000, I brought along a small, light weight tripod with 2 matching baseplates for quick camera changes.  Both the E-M5 and FZ1000 have excellent 5-axis image stabilization built-in, but for landscapes, I generally prefer to use a tripod and either a remote shutter release or timer.  I also switched between using the EVF’s on both cameras and the LCD’s.  The E-M5’s LCD tilts up and down, and the FZ1000’s not only tilts, but also swivels.  This allows you to put it in quite a few more positions than the E-M5’s, and is especially useful for getting unusual angels (very low or high).  Don’t get me wrong, both of them worked quite well, but I think the FZ1000’s was just a little bit better.

Please keep in mind that a lot of this comparison is very subjective.  We all have our personal preferences, and they can change quite frequently.  After having used the FZ1000 almost non-stop, I had to pause and get the feel for the E-M5 again.  It always feels solid, and looks like a finely crafted machine.  But it is smaller, along with all of its controls.  The FZ1000 felt more natural to use.  The FZ1000’s EVF is big and bright and made the E-M5’s EVF a pain to use.  But once I got re-acquainted with the E-M5, it ended up working out quite well.

Here are some examples from the FZ1000:




And just for comparison, here are a couple from the E-M5:


** Disclaimer – These images were edited for the original RAW files (that just the way I roll)!

I think the results speak for themselves. Just because you have a camera with a smaller sensor, don’t let that stop you from using it for serious landscapes. Serious in this case means specifically going out to capture scenic views, maybe at sunrise or sunset, rather than just grabbing a selfie or snapshot in passing. Yes, there are some advantages in using DSLR’s with large sensors, but they are by no means the only game in town! Keep your expectations realistic and work within the strengths of your camera rather than its limitations and you’ll do just fine!

That’s it for this post, until next time – Happy Shooting!

Mono Lake Drama

Mono Lake is one of my favorite places for photography.  My wife, 3 small dogs, and I make an annual trip to the Eastern Sierra for Fall colors and I always try to make the short trip to Mono Lake.  This year was no exception.

As usual, I brought along several cameras.  The lineup included my Olympus E-M5, Sony RX100, and Panasonic FZ1000.  So far the FZ1000 has seen the most use, followed closely by the RX100.  Sadly the E-M5 has seen no use (the trip isn’t over just yet).  Why the FZ1000?  Because it is the most versatile camera I have ever owned.  I used it to make photos of everything from the Alabama Hills and Eastern Sierra under nothing but moonlight, and to take quick snaps of a herd of deer passing through camp, handheld in low light.

Getting back to Mono Lake. I had a lot of fun with the FZ1000.  The clouds were really dramatic on the day of my visit.  They were so dramatic that they almost didn’t seem real.  I’m sure Mono Lake has had millions of photos made of it.  One of the things I like to do is see if I can find something different, something unique to set my photos apart.  The stormy sky was a big help with that!  The other thing I did was try out some of the different artistic modes available in the FZ1000.  I did shoot normally (RAW, aperture priority, ISO 125/200), but also made quite a few photos using the “Dramatic Black and White” mode.

Here are the results in Dramatic Black and White:

And just for fun, here are some in color (edited from the original RAW files):

I know there are some of you that are wondering if a camera like the FZ1000 is for you. Nobody can answer that question for you but you. But based on my experience using this camera, I can say with confidence that it is an amazing camera! Yes, it is considered a bridge camera (not a DSLR), and it has a 1″ sensor vs cameras with larger APS-C and M43 sensors. And one more thing, it really isn’t that small. In fact, it’s quite large compared to my E-M5. On the plus side, it is quick and easy to use. And not having to change lenses is huge! I carry it and a few other supplies in a small messenger bag. I think the image quality is excellent, and I’m able to tweak the RAW files as much (or little) as I want. Don’t count this camera out (or one like it) just because of its sensor size!

That’s it for this post, until next time Happy Shooting!