Tag Archives: Rokinon

Old Camera, New Tricks!

Catchy title, don’t you think?  Actually the camera I’m referring to in this case is my Olympus E-P3.  While it may only be a few years old now, in the world of electronics (including cameras), this is almost ancient!

As time goes on all things electronic evolve.  In the never ending quest to keep people buying their products, camera manufacturers continue to up the ante.  The E-P3 had many things going for it, especially the retro look and feel.  The camera was built very solid and felt good in your hands.  And it looked very cool too!  One of the techie features that I liked was the in-body image stabilization.  The only complaints I remember reading about was that the E-P3’s image sensor (12mp) was getting old and could/should have been updated.  But even with a “dated” sensor there was plenty of praise for the image quality just the same.

I’ve had my E-P3 for a couple years now, and even though I’ve added a newer camera to my collection, I find myself drawn to the E-P3.  For our 3 week trip to the Eastern Sierra this year I brought my newer Olympus E-M5, Canon 60D, and E-P3.  The 60D stayed in the bag and in the motorhome for the entire trip.  My main shooter was the E-M5, but the E-P3 went everywhere that the E-M5 did.  At 1st I put the 14-42mm kit lens on the E-P3 and figured that I’d just keep it in the bag for backup.  I did end up taking some pictures with it and was pleased overall with what I ended up with.  It was then when I got to thinking that maybe I could use the E-P3 for more than backup.

One of the things I try to do when photographing a landscape scene is the look for something to help make it pop.  Clouds, beautiful golden light, or a unique perspective.  Not necessarily a gimmick, but rather something to help tell the story of my composition.  And it turns out that I had something in the camera bag that would help with this perfectly!  The Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye lens!

The fisheye is definitely unique.  It provides a very wide, and somewhat distorted point of view.  It’s not something that you want to use all time, but it is fun to experiment with.  And since I had my main camera setup for serious shooting, I could play with my E-P3 and Rokinon all I wanted.  Don’t get me wrong, I love the E-M5, but there was something hard to describe about picking up and using the E-P3 again.  It was fun!

My E-P3 has been with me for 2 years of shooting.  Sometimes it hasn’t been pleasant.  Not the camera, but what it has had to go though.  I’ve taken on hikes, in the rain, and snow.  It’s gotten soaked, and dropped twice.  I had some cuts and bruises but I healed.  My poor little E-P3 still has its battle scars.  There are a few nicks and dings on its body, and the pop-up flash doesn’t work anymore.  But it still fires up and takes pictures like a champ, and I think I love it even more now!

That’s enough of me singing the praises of the E-P3, here are some photos from its last outing:

That’s it for this post. Until next time, Happy Shooting!

Imperial Beach, Before and After

Imperial Beach on Superbowl Sunday was fantastic.  The sunset wasn’t especially colorful, but the cloud formations were amazing!

I used my Olympus EM-5  with Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye lens mounted on a tripod.  In order to make sure there was absolutely no camera shake created by me pressing the shutter, I used the 2 second timer.

In case you’re interested, these are of the settings I used:

  • Aperture Priority
  • Format – RAW
  • ISO – 200
  • Aperture – f/11
  • Shutter Speed – 1/60th
  • Exposure Compensation – +0.3

Here’s what I got:
Imperial Beach, After

The out of camera results aren’t bad, but if anything perhaps a little dull.  And yes, I do recognize that there is some distortion, but I’m ok with that. This is a fisheye image after all.  I’ve mentioned it in some of my other on-line forum posts and I’ll say it here – I like the fisheye effect. I don’t use it all the time, and think that limited use is probably better than too much. But, there are times when a scene seems just perfect for it, and this was one of those times!

I’m not going to go into great detail on the adjustments that I made. There are plenty of excellent tutorials on-line for that. This is more of a high fly-over. In Adobe Photoshop RAW, I bumped up the Clarity setting. To my eye, this has the effect of tweaking the midrange tones. After that I did some work in Photoshop. Not much, but I did adjust the levels a bit. To finish it I bumped up the color saturation, cropped it a little from the bottom, and added a vignette .  This is the result:

Imperial Beach, After

The changes are subtle and simple, but lately I like that. I used to be much more into HDR images, but I’ve backed that off a lot.  As much fun as it was to make a series of images into something really grungy, I think I’ve gotten that out of my system. Just like using the fisheye sparingly, I’m going to keep HDR as a technique, a tool that I can use when the time is right.

That’s it for now.  Until next time – Happy Shooting!